versatilism
earthstory:

Petroleum in quartz
Unusual inclusions these, and they have the added bonus of making the usually inert quartz glow in UV light since crude oil fluoresces (for an explanation of this phenomenon see http://tinyurl.com/kebod3b). They form when hot hydrothermal fluids rich in silica flow in oil containing rocks and precipitate there in pores and gaps, forming crystals such as this Herkimer diamond type pair with petroleum trapped in the cavities within the crystal. This specimen comes from Pakistan, and measures 3.6 cm across.
Loz
Image credit:http://betweenarockandaheartyplace.blogspot.com/2012/02/quartz-with-petroleum-inclusions.html

Never heard of this before.

earthstory:

Petroleum in quartz

Unusual inclusions these, and they have the added bonus of making the usually inert quartz glow in UV light since crude oil fluoresces (for an explanation of this phenomenon see http://tinyurl.com/kebod3b). They form when hot hydrothermal fluids rich in silica flow in oil containing rocks and precipitate there in pores and gaps, forming crystals such as this Herkimer diamond type pair with petroleum trapped in the cavities within the crystal. This specimen comes from Pakistan, and measures 3.6 cm across.

Loz

Image credit:http://betweenarockandaheartyplace.blogspot.com/2012/02/quartz-with-petroleum-inclusions.html

Never heard of this before.

mapsontheweb:

1913 Religious Map of Africa by John Bartholomew and Son, Edinburgh, Scotland

mapsontheweb:

1913 Religious Map of Africa by John Bartholomew and Son, Edinburgh, Scotland

transhumanisticpanspermia:

anticapitalist:

This is like straight out of Clockwork Orange

Future biotechnology could be used to trick a prisoner’s mind into thinking they have served a 1,000 year sentence, a group of scientists have claimed.

 Dr Roache said drugs could be developed to distort prisoners’ minds into thinking time was passing more slowly.

"There are a number of psychoactive drugs that distort people’s sense of time, so you could imagine developing a pill or a liquid that made someone feel like they were serving a 1,000-year sentence," she said.

And if that weren’t scary enough:

A second scenario would be to upload human minds to computers to speed up the rate at which the mind works, she wrote on her blog.

"If the speed-up were a factor of a million, a millennium of thinking would be accomplished in eight and a half hours… Uploading the mind of a convicted criminal and running it a million times faster than normal would enable the uploaded criminal to serve a 1,000 year sentence in eight-and-a-half hours. This would, obviously, be much cheaper for the taxpayer than extending criminals’ lifespans to enable them to serve 1,000 years in real time."

………..

This is some of the most sadistic, horrible logic I’ve ever seen as a rationale for developing technology

According to a recent report by Reuters, a staggering 95% of the world’s cash machines still run on Windows XP operating system.

The soon to be shunned XP operating system will no longer be supported by MIcrosoft past the 8th of April deadline. So what does this mean for our cash machines and why on earth are they still using such a dated operating system?

techfutures:

Stanford University develops $90 iPhone accessory to replace ophthalmology kit costing tens of thousands
Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have developed two low-cost iPhone adapters that provide images of the eye that usually require specialist ophthalmology equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars. The university hopes that it will be useful both for primary care physicians in the U.S. as well as rural medical centres in developing countries.
The adapters make it easy for anyone with minimal training to take a picture of the eye and share it securely with other health practitioners or store it in the patient’s electronic record.
“Think Instagram for the eye,” said one of the developers, assistant professor of ophthalmology Robert Chang, MD 
…
The device shines a light through the lens of the eyeball which is reflected back, where a magnifying lens focuses an image on the camera, allowing it to capture detailed photos of both the front and back of the eye. Images can be almost instantly added to medical records for later review by a specialist, or can be transmitted from a primary care worker in a remote area to a specialist who can provide advice on the medical attention required for an eye injury.
“Adapting smartphones for the eye has the potential to enhance the delivery of eye care — in particular, to provide it in places where it’s less accessible,” said ophthalmology resident David Myung, MD, PhD. “Whether it’s in the emergency department, where patients often have to wait a long time for a specialist, or during a primary-care physician visit, we hope that we can improve the quality of care for our patients, especially in the developing world where ophthalmologists are few and far between.”
The prototypes were made from components commonly available online, and it’s hoped that 3D printing will reduce the cost even further.

techfutures:

Stanford University develops $90 iPhone accessory to replace ophthalmology kit costing tens of thousands

Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have developed two low-cost iPhone adapters that provide images of the eye that usually require specialist ophthalmology equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars. The university hopes that it will be useful both for primary care physicians in the U.S. as well as rural medical centres in developing countries.

The adapters make it easy for anyone with minimal training to take a picture of the eye and share it securely with other health practitioners or store it in the patient’s electronic record.

“Think Instagram for the eye,” said one of the developers, assistant professor of ophthalmology Robert Chang, MD

The device shines a light through the lens of the eyeball which is reflected back, where a magnifying lens focuses an image on the camera, allowing it to capture detailed photos of both the front and back of the eye. Images can be almost instantly added to medical records for later review by a specialist, or can be transmitted from a primary care worker in a remote area to a specialist who can provide advice on the medical attention required for an eye injury.

“Adapting smartphones for the eye has the potential to enhance the delivery of eye care — in particular, to provide it in places where it’s less accessible,” said ophthalmology resident David Myung, MD, PhD. “Whether it’s in the emergency department, where patients often have to wait a long time for a specialist, or during a primary-care physician visit, we hope that we can improve the quality of care for our patients, especially in the developing world where ophthalmologists are few and far between.”

The prototypes were made from components commonly available online, and it’s hoped that 3D printing will reduce the cost even further.

The Engima Machine - Great Video Explanation

How the Engima machine works:

How the Engima code was cracked:

More stuff on the Enigma machine:

If World War One was a bar fight.
H/T: @DanMohrBlog

Nido Taniam, from India’s northeastern state Arunachal Pradesh, was a student of Lovely Professional University in Punjab. He was on holiday in Delhi when he stopped at Lajpat Nagar market to ask for directions on January 30. Shopkeepers thrashed him and next day he died of injuries.

The death spurred outrage and widespread protests against continued racial attacks on those with Chinese looks.

"This is no random hooliganism. It is racism because we look physically different," Binalakshami Nepram, an activist, told DW. For years, people from the northeast have complained about racist slurs, jokes, assaults on the streets and harassments by landlords and employers.

By far and away the greatest name for a university of all time.

Proof this isn’t a joke.

Remote Scottish island runs on green ‘Eiggtricity’, dw.de

The Scottish island of Eigg is one of the world’s first islands to power itself exclusively with renewable energy. Locals say the change has boosted their quality of life, and that their energy bills are dropping.

Remote Scottish island runs on green ‘Eiggtricity’, dw.de

The Scottish island of Eigg is one of the world’s first islands to power itself exclusively with renewable energy. Locals say the change has boosted their quality of life, and that their energy bills are dropping.

Can mini scorpions save the dying bee?, dw.de

Many scientists believe that the varroa mite is one of the main causes for the recent mass deaths of bee populations around the world, a phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder. The varroa is a small parasite, also known as the vampire mite. It sucks blood from bees and their larvae. In doing so, it transports bacteria, fungus and pathogens to the bees.Experts estimate that Central Europe now has twenty-five percent fewer bees in comparison to thirty years ago, while in the US populations have declined by around a third.Bees are important for maintaining biodiversity, especially in their role pollinating flowering crops. Losing them could result in a shortage of fruit and vegetables as well as threaten crops that are important for feeding livestock, such as alfalfa for instance.Up until now, beekeepers have used chemicals such as formic acid in their fight against the varroa mite. But Torben Schiffer believes that the chemicals harm the bees themselves.Watching the book scorpions at work through a microscope is like observing a gruesome battle. The animals quickly approach the varroa mites, grab them with their large pincers and paralyse them with poison. They then drain their prey with their mandibles while already creeping towards their next victim at the same time.Back in 1951 the Austrian zoologist, Max Beier, documented symbiotic relationships between bees and book scorpions from which both organisms would benefit. The bees are cleaned of parasites while the book scorpions have plenty to feed on. Nowadays however, few beekeepers know about the small brown animals.Torben Schiffer believes that the arachnids were driven out by chemicals originally designed to fight varroa mites. Another problem, he believes, is that many beekeepers use beehives made from plastic, which don’t provide a suitable habitat. “You’ve got to have wooden hives in order to have a micro-fauna,” Schiffer told DW. “The babies of the book scorpions need to have very small prey animals and they are found in natural materials like wood or hay.”However, some experts view Schiffer’s findings with scepticism. They question whether book scorpions really are a viable answer to the varroa problem. “It’s very impressive to see how the book scorpion attacks varroa mites under lab conditions”, said Peter Rosenkranz, an expert on the varroa mite at the University of Hohenheim. “But in order to make a real impact, it won’t be sufficient to kill off a few individual mites.” Between spring and autumn varroa mite populations can grow by a factor of fifty or more, Rosenkranz explains."The mites have to be put under permanent pressure," he told DW. "Based on the existing data, I doubt that book scorpions would be able to do this."According to Peter Rosenkranz, independent scientific research on the book scorpion is needed to determine its effectiveness against varroa infestations.

Can mini scorpions save the dying bee?, dw.de

Many scientists believe that the varroa mite is one of the main causes for the recent mass deaths of bee populations around the world, a phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder. The varroa is a small parasite, also known as the vampire mite. It sucks blood from bees and their larvae. In doing so, it transports bacteria, fungus and pathogens to the bees.

Experts estimate that Central Europe now has twenty-five percent fewer bees in comparison to thirty years ago, while in the US populations have declined by around a third.

Bees are important for maintaining biodiversity, especially in their role pollinating flowering crops. Losing them could result in a shortage of fruit and vegetables as well as threaten crops that are important for feeding livestock, such as alfalfa for instance.

Up until now, beekeepers have used chemicals such as formic acid in their fight against the varroa mite. But Torben Schiffer believes that the chemicals harm the bees themselves.

Watching the book scorpions at work through a microscope is like observing a gruesome battle. The animals quickly approach the varroa mites, grab them with their large pincers and paralyse them with poison. They then drain their prey with their mandibles while already creeping towards their next victim at the same time.

Back in 1951 the Austrian zoologist, Max Beier, documented symbiotic relationships between bees and book scorpions from which both organisms would benefit. The bees are cleaned of parasites while the book scorpions have plenty to feed on. Nowadays however, few beekeepers know about the small brown animals.

Torben Schiffer believes that the arachnids were driven out by chemicals originally designed to fight varroa mites. Another problem, he believes, is that many beekeepers use beehives made from plastic, which don’t provide a suitable habitat. “You’ve got to have wooden hives in order to have a micro-fauna,” Schiffer told DW. “The babies of the book scorpions need to have very small prey animals and they are found in natural materials like wood or hay.”

However, some experts view Schiffer’s findings with scepticism. They question whether book scorpions really are a viable answer to the varroa problem. “It’s very impressive to see how the book scorpion attacks varroa mites under lab conditions”, said Peter Rosenkranz, an expert on the varroa mite at the University of Hohenheim. “But in order to make a real impact, it won’t be sufficient to kill off a few individual mites.” Between spring and autumn varroa mite populations can grow by a factor of fifty or more, Rosenkranz explains.

"The mites have to be put under permanent pressure," he told DW. "Based on the existing data, I doubt that book scorpions would be able to do this."

According to Peter Rosenkranz, independent scientific research on the book scorpion is needed to determine its effectiveness against varroa infestations.

saucefactory:

ifbuteverythought:

amandaonwriting:

Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (BPA) - Resource for Crime Writers

SOURCE

REBLOGGING THIS FOR ABSOLUTELY LEGAL AND NON-CREEPY REASONS

Coming soon to a scaremongering tabloid headline near you…. The Y10K Problem.

The Year 10,000 problem (also known as the Y10K problem or the deca-millennium bug) is the class of all potential software bugs that would emerge when the need to express years with five digits arises. (Wikipedia)

Fortunately, Brian Eno, (yes, that one) and some of his mates are charging to the rescue. They’ve set up the Long Now Foundation to make sure mankind is ready.

The Long Now Foundation, established in ‘01996’, is a private, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization based in San Francisco that seeks to become the seed of a very long-term cultural institution. It aims to provide a counterpoint to what it views as today’s “faster/cheaper” mindset and to promote “slower/better” thinking. The Long Now Foundation hopes to “creatively foster responsibility” in the framework of the next 10,000 years, and so uses 5-digit dates to address the Year 10,000 problem (e.g., by writing “02014” rather than “2014”).

I think I need to set up ‘The Even Longer Now Foundation’ to combat the very worrying Y100K problem.

But I’ll let the Y1M Problem slide for now though. That’s aaaages away.